Apply Family Friendly Supervision Behaviors that Work

Lesson Details

This session focuses on translating each of the Family Friendly Supervisor behaviors to practical strategies that supervisors can adopt in the workplace. 

Participants will be able to: 

  • Identify and apply practical strategies to support employees with families. 
  • Provide the “right” type of family friendly supervision for the situation.

Course Lessons

This session focuses on translating each of the Family Friendly Supervisor behaviors to practical strategies that supervisors can adopt in the workplace. 

Participants will be able to: 

  • Identify and apply practical strategies to support employees with families. 
  • Provide the “right” type of family friendly supervision for the situation.

Four Family Friendly Supervision Behaviors

Lesson Details

A family-friendly supervisor is supportive of employees’ family roles. This session focuses on teaching participants about the four kinds of family-friendly behaviors, including how to differentiate among them, and what the research suggests about them. 

Participants will be able to: 

  • Define family-friendly supervision and the four types of family-friendly supervisor behaviors. 
  • Explain the difference between emotional support, practical support, role-modeling and creative management. 
  • Recognize the benefits of supporting employees with families (i.e., business case).

Course Lessons

A family-friendly supervisor is supportive of employees’ family roles. This session focuses on teaching participants about the four kinds of family-friendly behaviors, including how to differentiate among them, and what the research suggests about them. 

Participants will be able to: 

  • Define family-friendly supervision and the four types of family-friendly supervisor behaviors. 
  • Explain the difference between emotional support, practical support, role-modeling and creative management. 
  • Recognize the benefits of supporting employees with families (i.e., business case).

How to Combat Flex Bias?

Lesson Details

This session increases self-awareness and provides practical strategies to help supervisors combat the flexibility bias. Participants will learn about the relevant research and the strong business case for flexible work arrangements. 

Participants will be able to: 

  • Recognize what research tells us about the impact of flexible work arrangements on productivity and profit 
  • Identify and apply strategies to overcome flexibility bias

Course Lessons

This session increases self-awareness and provides practical strategies to help supervisors combat the flexibility bias. Participants will learn about the relevant research and the strong business case for flexible work arrangements. 

Participants will be able to: 

  • Recognize what research tells us about the impact of flexible work arrangements on productivity and profit 
  • Identify and apply strategies to overcome flexibility bias

What is the Flex Work Bias & Why Does it Matter?

Lesson Details

Cultural norms encourage workers to stay late, be available 24/7, and rarely take time away from work. As a result, flexible workers are often the target of flexibility bias and those who need flexible arrangements may fear requesting or developing them. Flexible workers may be perceived as less productive and less committed to work. In this session participants will learn about the flexibility bias, the source of this bias as well as consequences. 

Participants will be able to: 

  • Reflect on personal beliefs, attitudes and biases regarding flexible work arrangements 
  • Understand the origin of the flexibility bias 
  • Define flexibility bias and flexibility stigma 
  • Understand the effect of flexibility bias and stigma on employees with families

Course Lessons

Cultural norms encourage workers to stay late, be available 24/7, and rarely take time away from work. As a result, flexible workers are often the target of flexibility bias and those who need flexible arrangements may fear requesting or developing them. Flexible workers may be perceived as less productive and less committed to work. In this session participants will learn about the flexibility bias, the source of this bias as well as consequences. 

Participants will be able to: 

  • Reflect on personal beliefs, attitudes and biases regarding flexible work arrangements 
  • Understand the origin of the flexibility bias 
  • Define flexibility bias and flexibility stigma 
  • Understand the effect of flexibility bias and stigma on employees with families

Using Gratitude in Your Counseling Practice phase 2

Lesson Details

Course Lessons

Children and Therapy: Let’s Talk

Lesson Details

How do I know if my child needs therapy?  

What is my role in my child’s therapy?  

How do I know if therapy is working?  

Children develop in unique ways and there is a wide range of behaviors that may be normal for a given child. Some children are especially sensitive, others tend toward the more active, even aggressive side. Parents help children cope with negative emotions and learn to regulate their behavior. This is all part of typical child development and the challenges of being a parent At times, children’s difficulties managing their own feelings and their behavior may become more serious or they may last longer than a few weeks. If children are having problems in more than one setting (both at home and at school), if they appear distressed or upset for more than a few weeks, if your efforts to address the problem have not been successful and if their behavior is getting in the way of their normal activities, it may be time to seek guidance from a therapist.   

This class will help you think about how to choose a therapist and what to expect from the therapy experience for your child. You will learn practical ways that you can be helpful to your child and ways you can expect your child’s therapist to help both you and your child. You will learn about the importance of setting realistic goals and how to know if your child and your family are making progress towards those goals. Therapy can make a positive difference for your child and for your relationship, especially when you know how to be an active and positive part of the process.

Course Lessons

How do I know if my child needs therapy?  

What is my role in my child’s therapy?  

How do I know if therapy is working?  

Children develop in unique ways and there is a wide range of behaviors that may be normal for a given child. Some children are especially sensitive, others tend toward the more active, even aggressive side. Parents help children cope with negative emotions and learn to regulate their behavior. This is all part of typical child development and the challenges of being a parent At times, children’s difficulties managing their own feelings and their behavior may become more serious or they may last longer than a few weeks. If children are having problems in more than one setting (both at home and at school), if they appear distressed or upset for more than a few weeks, if your efforts to address the problem have not been successful and if their behavior is getting in the way of their normal activities, it may be time to seek guidance from a therapist.   

This class will help you think about how to choose a therapist and what to expect from the therapy experience for your child. You will learn practical ways that you can be helpful to your child and ways you can expect your child’s therapist to help both you and your child. You will learn about the importance of setting realistic goals and how to know if your child and your family are making progress towards those goals. Therapy can make a positive difference for your child and for your relationship, especially when you know how to be an active and positive part of the process.