Enjoy Watching Navigate Screen Time: The New Normal FB Live Event

Enjoy Ruth Freeman LCSW, Amy Alamar Ed D, Autumn Cloud-Ingram LMSW and Aaron Weintraub MS as they discuss navigating screen time during this new normal.

Now more than ever, screen time is a fact of life for parents and children. We will discuss the use and over-use of technology used for schoolwork, socializing, and leisure. We’ll talk about the opportunities and challenges it presents to families during the new normal. Learn practical strategies parents and children can use to truly embrace this new digital frontier without fear and within reason. You will learn strategies to:• Teach your children digital citizenship• Develop an open conversation for the unpredictable• Help your child develop a strong moral filter• Support your child’s social life online and off.

Audience: parents of children 2-18

Parenting LGBTQ+ Youth: Let’s Talk Roundtable 6/22 8pm

If you are the parent of a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning (LGBTQ) child, you probably have a lot of questions. Your support is key to your child’s well-being, but you may have to go through your own process to get there. Start with, “I’m here for you and love you,” even if you don’t understand and aren’t ok at the moment. Plan to get your own support so that you can process your deepest emotions and concerns, while helping your child to deal with their own. Join Peace At Home guest experts Barbara Esgalhado, PhD and Poshi Walker, MSW with founder Ruth Freeman, LCSW to gain some ideas about helping your child thrive, while exploring your own path to understanding and genuine acceptance.

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Self Care: Put on Your Oxygen Mask First Facebook Live Event at 8pm May 25

Your focus for the past year has been on keeping your kids safe, engaged in school and making miracles to help them feel socially connected. Self-care? Out the window. With summer on the horizon maybe you are feeling a glimmer of hope. Let’s build on that. We will talk about the impact of your own self-care on your kids, your body and your mental health. We hope you will share your solutions and be ready to hear some new ideas from our Peace At Home specialists. You can do this! Dana Ashby,MA, MEd
Autumn Cloud-Ingram, LMSW
Stephanie Rondeau, MS, LAT, ATC, CSCS, CHC

View on our Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/PeaceAtHomeParenting/videos/521777182317869/

In Celebration of BMHW

At Peace At Home Parenting Solutions, we are grateful for the current attention to maternal mortality rates in the US. We are committed to supporting diverse parents, including the most vulnerable, to reach the goal of healthy births and infant development. through our Peace At Home Parenting Healthy Birth program.

“Managing Meltdowns” – Facebook Live Round Table Tuesday March 23 at 8:15pm EST

View Event on Our Facebook Page >

Participate Tuesday, March 23rd at 8:15 pm in a free, live round table event, “Managing Meltdowns” for parents of children ages birth-8. Join presenters Ruth Freeman LCSW, JoAnn Robinson PhD, and Cora Megan MA to:

  • Learn why emotional meltdowns occur in young children
  • Learn how caregivers can manage their own distress during meltdowns
  • Learn positive approaches to help children calm down
  • Learn ways to talk with your child about strong feelings after they occur, and
  • Learn about positive routines to help prevent emotional meltdowns

FREE Live Facebook Event: Positive Discipline, Peaceful Home (2-12 years old)

Positive Discipline, Peaceful Home (2-12 years old)- FREE Live Facebook Event

Please join Ruth Freeman, LCSW, Cora Megan, MA and Aaron Weintraub, MS for this LIVE FACEBOOK EVENT on Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 8pm EST

At 8 PM, Tuesday, January 26 WATCH LIVE We suggest that you watch the following recorded classes to prepare for our upcoming live Facebook event. Choose the best Positive Discipline Recording for the age(s) of your children.
  • Be Your Child’s Calm Center, and
  • Positive Discipline for Peace at Home, or
  • Positive Discipline for Toddlers and Preschoolers
  • Ask questions on the spot, tell us about your challenges and hear from other parents
  • Discover myths that may keep you repeating ineffective discipline techniques (actually increasing misbehavior)
  • Learn strategies that increase and sustain child compliance (evidence-based, and attainable)

Gain simple, practical tools to raise cooperative, confident and connected children!

Facebook LIVE: Depression and Anxiety in Children and Teens 7pm 12/30

Predictable days stabilize the lives of children and teens, but planning those days has been made more difficult for parents since the onset of the pandemic. Uncertainty, social isolation and parent distress all have on impact on the mental health of kids and teens. Join Peace At Home Parenting founder Ruth E. Freeman, LCSW and teachers Aaron Weintraub, MS and Denise Parent, LMFT and other concerned parents like yourself for a focused conversation to help you recognize symptoms and find solutions to address your child’s emotional needs as well as your own.

Rewatch the FB Live Event – Meltdowns, Tantrums: Kids Simply Struggling to Behave

Watch our Facebook Live event when we talked about meltdowns, tantrums, and kids simply struggling to behave.

JoAnn Robinson, PhD, Peace At Home early childhood expert, parent and grandmother and Ruth Freeman, LCSW and Peace At Home Founder had a informational discussion on Emotional Meltdowns and Behavior Struggles in Young Children.

Does My Child Need To Be In Therapy?

By Katherine Bergamo

Maybe you are thinking about taking your child to see a therapist. Or maybe you are just wondering about whether your child’s behavior is in the “normal” range. Maybe a teacher or childcare provider has expressed some concerns. In any case, you probably have questions, the main one being, “how can I help?”

Here are some important tips to help you get started:

How do I know if my child needs therapy?

Your child may not vocalize that they need, or are interested, in therapy.  If your child is displaying any of these signs, it may be time to talk to someone – ask yourself, Does my child…

  • Have trouble managing emotions or behaviors
  • Seem distressed or upset for more than a few weeks
  • Have problems in more than one setting – like both home and school or school and childcare
  • Display behavior is getting in the way of everyday activities
  • And finally, if your efforts to support your child are not helping, it may be time to ask for help.

Every child is unique and displays their emotions and behaviors differently.  Your child may display different signs than the ones listed above. You know your child best. If you feel they are struggling and in need of help, reach out and speak to a therapist.

How do I Choose a Therapist for My Child?

It’s important to choose a therapist that you, your family, and your child trust. Start by asking people you trust – medical professionals, teachers, or maybe even friends and family. Most professionals recommend a therapist that is licensed such as a social worker, psychologist, professional counselor, or a marriage and family therapist. A good place to begin is to find a therapist whose training matches your specific concerns.  These concerns could be family issues, anxiety, depression, behavior problems, divorce, or other major family transitions to name a few.  Don’t hesitate to ask the therapist about their experience in treating the specific concerns you have and ask about the approaches that they use. It helps to ask if the approach is “evidence-based,” which means research has shown these strategies to be effective with children who have these particular challenges.

Trust your instincts and listen to your child. Make sure you support your child to see the therapist for at least 4 weeks and then assess the person and the process together. As a parent, you want to be sure that your child is seeing a therapist who includes you in the process, invites you to be part of goal setting, and offers you specific guidance about ways you can support your child.

There are no wrong questions to ask the therapist, just as there are no wrong answers to give the therapist.  Here are a few questions to get you started:

  • What is your experience treating this kind of problem?
  • Do you expect us (parents) to be involved in sessions with our child?
  • Will you meet with us separately?
  • Will you develop behavior plans to try at home?
  • Will you ask us to help our child practice new skills?
  • Help us understand how therapy works and how it might be helpful for our particular child.